Language selector

Site

Search results

  1. Eliminating discrimination to advance the human rights of women and transgender people

    From: OHRC policy position on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes

    March 8, 2016 - Through its public education, policy development, outreach and litigation functions, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) continues to work with community partners to challenge gender inequality and promote and advance the human rights of women and trans people in Ontario. Here is some of the work the OHRC has done in the past year:  

  2. OHRC comment to the Ontario Ministry of Labour regarding Canada’s 2012 ILO Article 22 Report on Discrimination Convention 111

    This submission outlines recent developments for the reporting period June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2012 related to discrimination in employment and the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s (the OHRC) mandate. It includes OHRC activities, recent case law and comment regarding relevant ILO Committee observations and direct requests.

  3. Competing human rights – new guidance for everyday challenges

    From: Annual report 2012-2013 - Rights, Partners, Action!

    In April 2012, the OHRC launched its Policy on competing human rights. This policy outlines steps that sectors, organizations and individuals can take to address everyday situations of competing rights and help to avoid the need for legal action. The policy may also give guidance to the HRTO and the courts to address cases where litigation cannot be avoided.

  4. Introduction

    From: Policy on creed and the accommodation of religious observances

    The Code states that it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the inherent dignity and worth of every person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination. The Code aims at creating a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person, so that each person feels a part of the community and feels able to contribute to the community.

  5. 8. Meeting the accommodation needs of employees on the job

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    a) Duty to accommodate to the point of undue hardship

    The Code requires an effort, short of undue hardship, to accommodate the needs of persons who are protected by the Code. It would be unfair to exclude someone from the workplace or activities in the workplace because their Code-protected needs are different from the majority. The principle of accommodation applies to all grounds of the Code, but accommodation issues in employment most often relate to the needs of:

Pages