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  1. 5. The Ontario Human Rights Code

    From: Policy on female genital mutilation (FGM)

    The Ontario Human Rights Code recognizes the inherent worth and dignity of every person in Ontario. The Preamble makes particular reference to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the inherent principles of dignity and equal and inalienable rights of the person. The creation of a society in which all persons can live and work in an environment that is free from discrimination is central to the policy objectives of the OHRC by virtue of the Code.

  2. 7. Accommodation policy and procedure

    From: A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

    A. Description and rationale

    Under the Code, organizations are required to prevent and remove barriers and provide accommodation to the point of undue hardship. The principle of accommodation arises most frequently in the context of creed, family status, sex (pregnancy) and disability, as well as age, gender identity and gender expression.

  3. 7. Intersecting grounds

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

    Discrimination may be unique or distinct when it occurs based on two or more Code grounds. Such discrimination can be said to be “intersectional.” The concept of intersectional discrimination recognizes that people’s lives involve multiple interrelated identities, and that marginalization and exclusion based on Code grounds may exist because of how these identities intersect.

  4. 7. Pay, benefits, dress codes and other issues

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    a) Human rights training and education for employees

    As is noted in Section IV-1a(v) – “Educate and train employees on policies and procedures,” it is expected that all employees will receive human rights training so that they can know and understand their obligations in the workplace. It is very important that this be done for employees providing services to the public and senior staff responsible for hiring, managing performance, accommodations, discipline and handling human rights concerns. Failing to train these key staff may lead to human rights claims.

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