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  1. Sexual harassment & sex discrimination at work

    From: OHRC policy position on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes

    March 8, 2016 - The OHRC recognizes the severe impacts of sexual harassment on working women and trans people. It can reduce employees’ morale, decrease productivity and contribute to physical and emotional effects such as anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The United Nations’ Declaration of the Elimination of Violence Against Women specifically recognizes that sexual harassment is a form of violence against women.

  2. Starting in a “good way”: towards trusting relationships with Indigenous peoples

    From: A bold voice: Annual report 2016-2017


    Our strategic focus:

    The OHRC will embody human rights by engaging in and sustaining trusting relationships with First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities and groups. These relationships will be built on dignity and respect, and on working to advance reconciliation and substantive equality. We will contribute to nation-wide efforts that recognize the enduring impact of colonialism on Indigenous peoples. We will work in collaboration to support Indigenous communities as they determine and advance their own human rights goals and priorities.

  3. Part 1 – Setting the context: understanding race, racism and racial discrimination

    From: Policy and guidelines on racism and racial discrimination

    1. Introduction

    1.1. The Code context

    The Code states that it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the inherent dignity and worth of every person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination. The provisions of the Code are aimed at creating a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person, so that each person feels a part of the community and feels able to contribute to the community.

  4. Business Plan 2017/18 - 2019/20

    Section 1: Executive Summary

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is an arm’s-length agency of the government of Ontario established under the Ontario’s Human Rights Code. The function of the OHRC is to protect, promote and advance respect for human rights in Ontario, as well as identify and promote the elimination of discriminatory practices, all in the public interest. The OHRC works in many different ways to fulfill this mandate, including through education, policy development, public inquiries and litigation.

  5. Section III: The balancing tools

    From: Balancing conflicting rights: Towards an analytical framework

    This section of the paper surveys the balancing tools found in the Code and relevant case law. Documents such as Commission briefing notes and Policy Papers provide invaluable commentary on these tools and their insights are woven into the following discussion. The goal of this section is to identify the resources for balancing conflicting rights that will be utilized in the scenarios discussed in Section IV.

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