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  1. Spreading the message about human rights in housing: you can help!

    June 1, 2011 - At the Ontario Human Rights Commission, we have heard many stories of discrimination in rental housing. Some people face discrimination right at the beginning of their search – in rental housing advertisements. Tenants and advocates have brought a number of these ads to our attention. As a result, we are working with partners in housing and the media to increase awareness of human rights in housing, and find ways to prevent and address discriminatory ads.
  2. Human rights, sexuality and religion: Between policy and identity

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    As important policy changes are discussed and opened to public response, the urgency to reflect more critically about the narrow and essentialized identity constructions within policy is evidenced. While there will continue to be conflict in the public arena regarding religion and sexuality, from those who identify solely with one aspect and condemn or criticize the other, our policies should be reflective and inclusive of more than these narrow assumptions; if our policies and the application of policies can become more adaptive in response to these challenges, perhaps the assumed inherent conflict can be managed with more productive, alternative strategies.

  3. On religious accommodation and discrimination in the experience of Jewish communities in Ontario

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    The paper explores new stresses on accommodation as traditionally sought by the Jewish community in light of growing religious diversity and competing rights. Hard earned accommodations have become a focus of debate as demands of multiculturalism are broadened and challenged.

  4. Analytical framework

    From: Whether the para-transit services provided by public transit services in the cities of Toronto, Hamilton, London, and Windsor are special programs under the Ontario Human Rights Code

    General principles regarding the interpretation of human rights legislation

    In considering the interpretation and application of section 14(1) of the Code to the para-transit services in question, it is important to articulate the principles which govern how human rights legislation ought to be interpreted.

  5. Appendix 6 – The Code and the classroom: taking the human rights temperature of your school (for students)

    From: Teaching human rights in Ontario - A guide for Ontario schools

    Introduction

    This activity is based on “Taking the Human Rights Temperature of Your School” which was adapted from the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights.[4]

    You can evaluate your school’s human rights climate using criteria derived from both the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (the Declaration) and the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code). The questions here are adapted from both of these sources.

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