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  1. 4. Intersecting grounds

    From: Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability

    Discrimination may be unique or distinct when it occurs based on two or more Code grounds. Such discrimination is said to be “intersectional.” The concept of intersectional discrimination recognizes that people’s lives involve multiple interrelated identities, and that marginalization and exclusion based on Code grounds may exist because of how these identities intersect.

  2. 4. Potential threshold criteria for qualifying as a creed

    From: Human rights and creed research and consultation report

    Whatever policy definition is eventually adopted, leaving the definition of creed completely open-ended, without any threshold criteria, could impose too onerous a burden on Ontario organizations to determine what constitutes a creed meriting protection under the Code. It would also fail to recognize the few limits and guidelines that have been set out in existing case law.

  3. 4. Systemic faithism

    From: Human rights and creed research and consultation report

    Systemic faithism refers to the ways that cultural and societal norms, systems, structures and institutions directly or indirectly, consciously or unwittingly,[128] promote, sustain or entrench differential (dis)advantage for individuals and groups based on their faith (understood broadly to include religious and non-religious belief systems). Systemic faithism can adversely affect both religious and non-religious persons, depending on the context, as discussed in the examples below.

  4. 4. The OHRC’s 2008-2012 priorities, initiatives and impacts

    From: Ontario Human Rights Commission Submission regarding Section 57 three-year statutory review of the Ontario Human Rights System

    In November 2008, following public town hall meetings with individuals and groups across the province, the OHRC finalized strategic and business plans to guide its work under its new mandate for the following three years. Our aim is to educate, empower and mobilize partners in communities across the province to raise awareness, help identify concerns and implement solutions.

  5. 4. What are competing rights?

    From: Policy on competing human rights

    In general, competing human rights involve situations where parties to a dispute claim that the enjoyment of an individual or group’s human rights and freedoms, as protected by law, would interfere with another’s rights and freedoms. This complicates the normal approach to resolving a human rights dispute where only one side claims a human rights violation. In some cases, only one party is making a human rights claim, but the claim conflicts with the legal entitlements of another party or parties.

  6. 5. Interviewing and making hiring decisions

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    This section describes the human rights issues that commonly arise in interviews, some of the types of questions that may or may not be asked, and how to make hiring decisions that do not contravene the Code. Supervisors, managers and human resources staff who are responsible for making hiring decisions must be trained and educated to identify and eliminate discrimination, harassment and barriers to advancement for persons protected by the Code.

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