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  1. 2. About this policy

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed

    This policy is a complete revision and update of the OHRC’s original Policy on creed and the accommodation of religious observances first published in 1996. It sets out the OHRC’s position on creed and accommodating observances related to a person's creed.

    The policy offers Ontario citizens and organizations ways to address and prevent discrimination and conflict based on creed in an informed, proactive and principled way. In keeping with the Preamble to the Code, this policy is also designed to:

  2. 2. Arguments for not limiting the definition of creed to religion and including secular ethical and moral beliefs

    From: Human rights and creed research and consultation report

    2. 1. Principles of statutory construction and interpretation

    Some of the main arguments for not limiting the OHRC policy definition of creed to religion are derived from principles of statutory construction and interpretation. Among those discussed below include:

  3. 2. Legal framework

    From: Human rights and creed research and consultation report

    Court decisions such as “O’Malley[384] have established that organizations governed by the Code have a duty to accommodate individuals’ creed observances up to the point of undue hardship, regardless of whether established organizational norms, standards, rules or requirements adversely affect creed adherents’ ability to follow the tenets of their creed by design, intent or simply effect.

  4. 2. Why examine racial profiling?

    From: Under suspicion: Research and consultation report on racial profiling in Ontario

    Racial profiling is a specific type of racial discrimination that pertains to safety and security. The OHRC currently defines racial profiling as:

    [A]ny action undertaken for reasons of safety, security or public protection that relies on stereotypes about race, colour, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, or place of origin rather than on reasonable suspicion, to single out an individual for greater scrutiny or different treatment.[22]

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