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  1. Refocusing, redefining creed

    From: Annual Report 2015 - 2016: Reconnect. Renew. Results.

    Religious discrimination persists

    Many Canadians believe that religious discrimination is no longer a problem in contemporary society. They point to “multiculturalism,” recent efforts to promote reconciliation with First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, along with Canadians’ eagerness to resettle Syrian refugees, as proof that we have learned the lessons at the core of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

  2. Creed and human rights for Indigenous peoples

    What protection does the Ontario Human Rights Code offer?

    The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. Indigenous peoples, including status, non-status, First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, are included in these protections.

    The Code prohibits discrimination and harassment based on 17 personal attributes – called grounds. Creed is one of the protected grounds.

  3. Creed and the duty to accommodate: A checklist for accommodation providers

    Before you receive an accommodation request

    Minimize the need for accommodation up front by inclusively designing policies, rules, procedures, practices and spaces with everyone in mind (including people of diverse creed faiths).

    Create an open, inclusive and safe environment free of discrimination and harassment so that people feel safe and welcome to express or observe their creed and ask for creed-related accommodations, without fear of reprisal or stigma. For example, you could:

  4. 4. Creed

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed

    Policy framework

    Creed is a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Ontario Human Rights Code. The fact that Ontario adopted the term creed (or "la croyance" in French) in its human rights legislation, and not another term (such as religion, religious belief or religious creed as used in other Canadian human rights statutes), is significant when interpreting its meaning. It suggests that creed may have a meaning that is distinct from these other closely related terms.[65]  

  5. 2. Arguments for not limiting the definition of creed to religion and including secular ethical and moral beliefs

    From: Human rights and creed research and consultation report

    2. 1. Principles of statutory construction and interpretation

    Some of the main arguments for not limiting the OHRC policy definition of creed to religion are derived from principles of statutory construction and interpretation. Among those discussed below include:

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