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  1. From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    September 2005 - This paper, prepared by the Ontario Human Rights Commission (Canada), is for presentation at a panel session of the International Symposium on Age Discrimination being held September 5, 2005 in London, England. The theme of the session is “Beyond legislation – achieving cultural and attitudinal change” and has as its objectives.

  2. Human Rights Legislation

    From: From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    Ontario is one of fourteen jurisdictions in Canada with anti-discrimination legislation. This includes the federal government, ten provinces and three territorial governments. In Ontario, the Human Rights Code (the 'Code') protects against discrimination on the ground of age in relation to accommodation (housing), goods, services and facilities, employment, contracts and membership in vocational associations.

  3. Compliance and promotion through the Human Rights Commission

    From: From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    Human rights commissions, established in almost all jurisdictions in Canada, typically have broad mandates to enforce and promote human rights. The purpose of promotion activity is to inform and educate in order to create awareness and impart knowledge of human rights. Protection of rights depends on people knowing about the rights they have and available mechanisms to enforce them, as well as knowing and accepting their obligations to uphold those rights.

  4. Conclusion

    From: From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    A human rights commission with a broad mandate is well placed to promote and protect the human rights interests of older persons and others because of age, especially groups who are particularly vulnerable, marginalized and hard to reach, because it can rely on a full range of compliance and promotion functions and powers in a manner not available to government and non-government institutions.

  5. Whether the para-transit services provided by public transit services in the cities of Toronto, Hamilton, London, and Windsor are special programs under the Ontario Human Rights Code

    2006 - Public transit in cities across Ontario is fundamental to the ability of many people to participate meaningfully in the life of their communities. Public transportation is used to access employment, education, public and social services and community activities. Equal access by persons with disabilities to public transportation is a right protected under the Ontario Human Rights Code (“Code”). Equal access to transit services in not a reality for many citizens of the Province and despite its importance in our daily lives, barriers to public transit services remain.

  6. The para-transit programs

    From: Whether the para-transit services provided by public transit services in the cities of Toronto, Hamilton, London, and Windsor are special programs under the Ontario Human Rights Code

    According to statistics compiled by the Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) for 2003, there are 74 para-transit programs providing public transit services in Ontario to almost ten million people.[5] The nature of para-transit programs vary widely across the province.  The service can be provided through a number of different institutions. 

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