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  1. 10. The duty to accommodate

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    Accommodation for employees with mental health illness in the workplace … isn’t just about hurt feelings, loss of dignity or a feeling of being treated unfair. It is about survival. It can be the straw that breaks you or it can be the hand that saves you. Not being accommodated meant that I had to use all my energy just to cope with the barriers that I identified at work, just to get through the day. At the end of the day, I was so exhausted that I could hardly drive home. – Written submission

  2. 11. Housing

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    The lack of affordable and suitable housing across Ontario was raised by individuals with mental health and addiction disabilities, and organizations. Statistics Canada’s 2006 Participation Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) shows that in Ontario, people with “emotional” disabilities are more likely to be in core housing need than the non-disabled population and people with other types of disabilities.

  3. 12. Employment

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    Work, paid or unpaid, is a fundamental part of realizing dignity, self-determination and a person’s full potential in society. In Ontario, people are protected from discrimination based on disability in employment. Employment includes paid employment, volunteer work, student internships, special job placements, and temporary, contract, seasonal or casual employment. Many consumer/survivors or people with addictions expressed their desire to work or volunteer, but could not without the accommodation they needed.

  4. 13. Services

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    Under the Code, service providers have a duty to provide services that are free from discrimination and harassment. “Services” is a very broad category and includes services designed for everyone (shops, restaurants or education), as well as those that apply specifically to people with mental health disabilities and addictions (the mental health system or addiction treatment centres).

  5. Appendix 2: List of organizations that provided written submissions

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO)

    Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE)

    ARCH Disability Law Centre (ARCH) 

    Canadian Auto Workers (CAW)

    Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association

    Canadian Mental Health Association Kawartha Lakes Branch

    Canadian Mental Health Association Ontario Branch (CMHA Ontario)

    Canadian Mental Health Association Sudbury-Manitoulin Branch  

    Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

    Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)

    College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO)

  6. OHRC releases consultation report on human rights, mental health and addictions

    September 13, 2012

    Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today released Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions. This report outlines what the OHRC heard in its largest-ever policy consultation across Ontario, and sets out a number of key recommendations and OHRC commitments to address human rights issues that affect people with mental health disabilities or addictions.

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