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Grounds of Discrimination

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Part 1 of the Code lists the grounds of discrimination. You cannot discriminate against another person or a group of people because of their citizenship, race, place of origin, ethnic origin, colour, ancestry, disability, age, creed, sex/pregnancy, family status, marital status, sexual orientation, receipt of public assistance –in housing only, and record of offence – in employment only.

PART 1 of the Code lists the grounds of discrimination — you cannot discriminate against another person or group of people because of their:

Collection of icons representing several of the 15 prohibited grounds.
  • citizenship
  • race
  • place of origin
  • ethnic origin
  • colour
  • ancestry
  • disability
  • age
  • creed
  • sex / pregnancy
  • family status
  • marital status
  • sexual orientation
  • gender identity
  • gender expression
  • receipt of public assistance
  • record of offence

Race-related grounds include: ethnic origin, colour and place of origin. In some instances, it may also include citizenship and ancestry.

Disability includes temporary and permanent disabilities, being in receipt of Workers Safety and Insurance Benefts in the past or at present present, learning disabilities, visible, invisible and perceived disabilities.

Age: for housing, you have to be 18 unless you are no longer under parental control.

Creed includes religions and beliefs.

Sex includes pregnancy and gender, that is, persons who are bisexual, transgenderists, trans-sexual or inter-sexed.

Sexual orientation includes persons who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or heterosexual.

Family status is the status of being in a parent child relationship.

Marital status includes being single, married, widowed, co-habitation and same-sex marriages.

Receipt of social assistance applies only to housing accommodation and includes for example, being in receipt of government-funded subsidies and supportive housing.

Record of offences includes provincial offences such as under the Highway Traffic Act, and federal offences for which a pardon has been granted.

On June 19, 2012, two new grounds were added to the Code, “gender identity” and “gender expression”. There is overlap between the two grounds and their precise meaning is still being explored.

 

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